October 9, 2014

From maps I did for Banyan Tree Hotels, focusing on Shangri-La and Lijiang in Yunnan, China. You can see more here: http://www.jasonpym.com/blog/

October 8, 2014

Dragons of Victorian London

September 10, 2014

sinobug:

THE VIEW FROM ABOVE" series on Flickr by itchydogimages/SINOBUG
- a collection of caterpillar images captured from the bird’s eye view
(Pu’er, Yunnan, China)

View all images in the THE VIEW FROM ABOVE series in my Flickr photostream HERE.

image

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

June 24, 2014

JQ’s new album is out, check it out here: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/jqwhitcombandfivebelow2

Here’s more on my art for the album cover: http://www.jasonpym.com/blog/2014/06/24/jqs-album-cover/

January 27, 2014

I’ve got a new Dali article in the latest issue of Zazi magazine…

December 5, 2013

My favourite bits of Dali: Some pictures from an article in the upcoming issue of Travelling Scope magazine (《旅游天地》杂志) on all my favourite things in Dali: Walking in the woods, Baizu myths, hot springs and of course the food :)….

November 23, 2013

Eating closed door soup

Literally:

to eat closed-door soup

Meaning:

to be left out in the cold; 
to be denied entrance

This expression can be used either for unwanted visitors, or if the person called on isn’t at home.

This is often combined with another phrase:

铁将军把门 – 吃闭门羹
tǐe jiāng jun bǎ mén, chī bì mén gèng
The iron general holds the door closed, [and the visitor had to] eat closed-door soup.

“Iron general” is the name given to traditional Chinese locks. 

November 23, 2013
Beard gone to seed

To say to an old man “At your age you should know better” in Yunnanese, you say that their beard has gone to seed.
For example, say an old man steals candy from a baby, the mother of the child may well scream at him:
死老棍儿,你胡子都起苔儿啦,还那么不懂事,咋个还欺个小娃娃。Sī lāo gǔnr, nì fùzi doù qì taìr la, haí nǎme bù dōn shì, zǎge haí qí ge xiào wāwā.
Literally: Dead old villain, your beard’s long gone to seed and you still don’t understand [how to behave], how can you bully a small child?
English: You nasty old geezer, you should know better at your age, picking on a little kid like that!
In Mandarin the phrase “your beard has gone to seed” is not used, but the meaning can be expressed as:
还活不明白Haí huó bù míngbai
Or
活了这么久,你怎么还不明白道理?Huó le zhème jiǔ, nǐ zěnme haí bù míngbai dào li?

Beard gone to seed

To say to an old man “At your age you should know better” in Yunnanese, you say that their beard has gone to seed.

For example, say an old man steals candy from a baby, the mother of the child may well scream at him:

死老棍儿,你胡子都起苔儿啦,还那么不懂事,咋个还欺个小娃娃。
Sī lāo gǔnr, nì fùzi doù qì taìr la, haí nǎme bù dōn shì, zǎge haí qí ge xiào wāwā.

Literally: Dead old villain, your beard’s long gone to seed and you still don’t understand [how to behave], how can you bully a small child?

English: You nasty old geezer, you should know better at your age, picking on a little kid like that!

In Mandarin the phrase “your beard has gone to seed” is not used, but the meaning can be expressed as:

还活不明白
Haí huó bù míngbai

Or

活了这么久,你怎么还不明白道理?
Huó le zhème jiǔ, nǐ zěnme haí bù míngbai dào li?

November 23, 2013

Anxiety

Meaning:

uneasy, fidgety, restless

These are a couple of the more fun Chinese characters – fidgety, restless anxiety is expressed by 忐忑 – which has the up (上) and down (下) characters over a heart (心).

November 23, 2013

To grab the Buddha’s foot in an emergency

Literally:

to grasp the Buddha’s foot in an emergency

Meaning:

to seek help at the last moment; 
to make a frantic last-minute effort

This comes from a longer phrase which runs:

When idle he neglects to burn incense,
yet when in trouble he desperately clutches the Buddha’s feet.

For example:

惠州学院中文系一老师则认为,考试前临急抱佛脚,对这学生掌握知识没什么好处,不可取。

However, a teacher at the Chinese Language Department of Huizhou College believes that such desperate cramming [=Buddha leg clutching] just before the exams in no way contributes to the students’ understanding of their subjects, and thus is undesirable.

In colloquial use it is more common to say:

临时抱佛脚
lín shí bào fó jiǎo

And this fits better with the whole phrase:

平时不烧香, 临时抱佛脚
píng shí bù shāo xiāng, lín shí bào fó jiǎo

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